A mastectomy is a major surgery that removes all or part of the breast. It’s usually done to treat breast cancer, but in some cases, it may be done to prevent breast cancer. If you’re scheduled for a mastectomy surgery from Thomson, you may feel anxious about what to expect.

Here’s a guide to help you prepare for your surgery.

1. Talk to your surgeon about your options.

Mastectomy surgery comes in different types, and the type you have will depend on several factors, including the size and location of the tumor, whether the cancer has spread to other parts of your body, and your personal preferences. Talk to your surgeon about the different types of mastectomies and which one is right for you.

2. Make sure you have someone to drive you home after surgery.

You won’t be able to drive yourself home after your mastectomy because you’ll be feeling the effects of the anesthesia. Make sure you have arranged for someone to pick you up and take you home. You might also want to have someone stay with you for the first day or two after surgery, just to help you out around the house.

3. Plan for some help with childcare and household duties.

You’ll need some time to recover after your surgery, so it’s a good idea to make arrangements for someone to help with childcare and household responsibilities while recovering. Ask a friend or family member if they can pitch in or hire a professional caretaker if necessary.

4. Stock up on healthy food and snacks.

Eating healthy will help you heal more quickly after your surgery, so ensure your fridge is stocked with healthy food and snacks that will give you the nutrients you need. Fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains, and low-fat dairy are all good choices. Avoid processed foods, sugary snacks, and alcoholic beverages while you’re recovering from surgery.

5. Get plenty of rest before your surgery.

Getting plenty of rest before undergoing any major surgery, including a mastectomy, is important. So in the days leading up to your operation, ensure you get plenty of sleep and take it as easy as possible.

6. Take care of any loose ends at work.

If you work full-time, ensure any loose ends are tied up at work before your surgery date. Once you’ve taken care of these practical matters, it’s time to focus on taking care of yourself both mentally and emotionally.

7. Talk about your fears with loved ones.

It’s normal—and perfectly understandable—to feel scared or anxious about undergoing such a major operation. Talking openly about your fears with friends or family can help ease your anxiety and theirs.

Endnote:

By following these simple tips, you can ease your anxiety and improve your chances of a successful recovery.

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